Situated on the edge of a harbour bigger than Sydney's, Darwin is a beautiful, fascinating tropical city – a melting pot of people and cultures that prides itself in its unique and friendly laid-back lifestyle. While a sophisticated, modern city in its own right, it is also one steeped in history, one that has endured many hardships on its way to establishing itself as the gateway to Asia. It is the home of NT commerce and business and with its world-class natural and cultural attractions it is also a thriving hub of activity in terms of tourism, nightlife and retail.

Here are just a few of the attractions well worth visiting while you are in town.

Things to do in Darwin

Australian Aviation Heritage Centre

Open daily, this centre features an impressive collection of the Territory's aviation history from the aviation pioneers and record breakers to the Territory's frontier role in WWII. There is a massive B52 Bomber, Mirage and Sabre jets, a Spitfire replica and Wessex and Huey Cobra helicopters. The development of the jet age is depicted through displays and photographs and the Bombing of Darwin exhibition here is a must see.

Burnett House

Built in the late 1930s, Burnett House is a Heritage-listed National Trust property and an excellent example of early tropical architecture. Here, you can relax in the gardens and enjoy ribbon sandwiches and Devonshire teas at High Tea every Sunday from 3.30-6pm.

Mindil Beach Sunset Markets

Held every Thursday and Sunday night from April 25th to October, these are Darwin's largest and most popular weekly markets. They feature a multitude of stalls offering international cuisine, arts, crafts and entertainment. The combination of great food and an electric atmosphere make it a must visit. Enjoy a picnic dinner on the beach while watching a spectacular tropical sunset.

Other popular markets worth visiting are the Saturday morning Parap Village Markets, the Sunday morning Nightcliff Markets and Rapid Creek Markets (Darwin's oldest markets) and Palmerston's Friday night markets.

Museum & Art Gallery of the NT

The museum, situated at Bullocky Point, features collections of the region's art, natural science, history and culture. Encompassing Aboriginal art and culture, arts and craft from south-east Asia and Pacific regions, maritime archaeology and Northern Territory history, the museum also houses a great Cyclone Tracy exhibit and the chance to meet Sweetheart, the Top End’s most famous crocodile.

Charles Darwin National Park

Just a short drive from the city, this park was developed to show visitors the rich mangrove habitats of Darwin Harbour. Relics of Darwin's involvement in WWII can also be seen here. These reinforced concrete bunkers were used for safe storage of munitions during the wartime action.

WWII Oil Storage Tunnels

One of the most interesting constructions in Darwin during WWII was the oil storage tunnels located near the Darwin Waterfront Precinct. Today, there are two tunnels open for viewing featuring a collection of photographs of Darwin and the men and women that served here during the war. An experienced guide will take you through the tunnels with informative commentary.

USS Peary Memorial

Salvaged from the wreck of the USS Peary, the gun, now situated on The Esplanade, serves as a memorial dedicated to the officers and crew who lost their lives when the vessel was attacked and sunk during the first air attack on Darwin by the Japanese during WWII. Also honoured here is Lt. Robert Buel, a US Air Force pilot who lost his life on February 15, 1942 in a heroic attack on Japanese aircraft on a bombing raid over Darwin city.

Darwin Convention Centre

This world class, multi-purpose Convention Centre with its spectacular waterfront location, is only minutes walk to the central business district or a wide choice of city centre hotels and only ten minutes drive to Darwin International Airport. The Centre features highly flexible and adaptive spaces to cater for all requirements.

Indo Pacific Marine

Darwin's only living marine environment centre gives the public an unparalleled opportunity to see and learn about this fragile world. It is one of three such exhibitions in the world and has won 13 awards for excellence and eco-tourism. The centre’s popular ‘coral reef by night’ program, to which bookings are essential, features a tour of the complex followed by a dinner and tour of the reef systems in the dark.

East Point Reserve & Lake Alexander

This recreational area has extensive walking and cycling paths, relaxing picnic areas with free barbecue facilities and safe, year-round swimming in Lake Alexander. The reserve is also home to Darwin's East Point Military Museum, which houses an extensive collection of photographs and informative displays including the Defence of Darwin Experience - an immersive, interactive, multimedia experience of the story of Darwin's role in World War II. East Point is also well known for its wallaby colony and is one of the best sites in Darwin for watching sunsets.